An analysis of the construction of feminism theory

The critical movement generally known as deconstruction centred on the instability and protean ambiguity of language.

An analysis of the construction of feminism theory

Get Full Essay Get access to this section to get all help you need with your essay and educational issues. Get Access Feminism and Constructivism: A Comparison Essay Sample The discipline of international relations IR is one that has witnessed a multitude of variations and shifts.

It has produced a fair amount of debate between academics within the international relations scholarship. Due to a plethora of circumstances scholars have subjected the traditional rationalist theories of neorealism and neoliberalism to critical re-evaluations.

As a result, constructivism is a concept that has emerged as an alternative approach to dominant IR theories. It focuses on the importance of state identities in defining and gaining knowledge of state interests, actions and goals. There are theorists who purport that the rise of constructivism allows for a further understanding of another international theory, feminism.

This is a branch of critical social theory that illlustrates how gender has been thought of or avoided in traditional international relations. While they are fundamentally different in many respects, it is the purpose of this essay to illustrate that similar ontological commitments allow both constructivists and feminists to share a focus centering on the concept of social construction.

The paper will provide a brief explication of constructivism and feminism before engaging in a comparative analysis of both theories, including a discussion of strengths, weaknesses and contemporary examples.

In order to gain a fuller understanding of the components involved it is first necessary to provide a brief introduction to the concepts. Theories of international relations were developed through three major debates and as such, IR ideas were traditionally dominated by the perspectives of realism, idealism and behaviouralism.

Criticisms leveled by critical theorists, combined with the end of the Cold War and a generational change, led to the displacement of established axes of debate by a new constructivist approach to IR literature. Rooted in sociology, constructivism is about human consciousness and the role of this feature in international life.

Dominant rationalist theories make distinctions between the actions and interests of states on the basis of economic and security concerns.

They believe states act in accordance with the material structural incentives of the international system. Conversely, a primary assumption of the constructivist approach is that identities, norms and culture play fundamentally important roles.

An argument is made on the mutual relationship between agents and structure. Constructivists argue that the identities and interests of states are not only structurally determined but socially constructed by interactions between states, institutions, norms and cultures.

The constructivist focus of inquiry is social phenomena such as norms, rules, institutions, language or productions. In sum, it is the process of social construction, the mechanisms that constitute reality, and not structure, which determines the manner in which states interact in world politics.

The decade of the s saw the beginnings of feminist IR scholarship. Carrying over to the latter stages of the s, for feminist political scientists such as Ann Tickner and Birgit Locher the third debate provided a new basis for an engagement between feminist scholars and mainstream IR proponents.

At its core, feminism is a branch of critical social theory that explores how gender is thought of or avoided entirely in international relation models such as rationalism or realism.

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The fundamental difference between this theory and the traditional realist model is that gender is established as a core tenet. It is not unitary in form and, akin to constructivism, there is a concentration on social relations.

It charts four theoretical developments that have extended the study of gender in significant ways: that is, intersectionality (analysis of interrelations between race, class, and gender), feminist poststructuralism, gender studies and performance (performance as a central aspect of the social construction of gender, e.g. in rites of passage. Feminist theory is the extension of feminism into theoretical, fictional, or philosophical discourse. It aims to understand the nature of gender inequality. It examines women's and men's social roles, experiences, interests, chores, and feminist politics in a variety of fields, such as anthropology and sociology, communication, media. 1 Theory, Feminism, and Feminist Theory. As we begin to consider feminist theory, we must examine a number of important and central issues, including.

These theorists contend that identity, gender, and indeed women, are social constructs. Many academics share the assumption that the world would be less competitive and less violent if women gained dominance in positions of power. The focus of this discussion is based on the premise that there are overlapping terrains in feminism and constructivism.

They share ontological commitments leading to a common research focus centering on concepts such as norms, rules, identities and institutions.

Feminists, like constructivists, formulate arguments under the theme of social construction. Yet despite these common ontological starting points, there are intrinsic differences to both theories relating to the concept of power that requires proper elucidation.

An analysis of the construction of feminism theory

Constructivism is not homogenous as some unified middle ground in the debate between post-modernism and rationalism. Scholars in this branch subscribe to a diverse set of incompatible propositions.

International life is social and thus international relations are constructed when people communicate, follow rules and norms, are guided by world views, perform rituals and engage in various social practices. Agency and structure are co-constituted, not incompatible.

An analysis of the construction of feminism theory

Social forms are thus not only regulative, but constitutive; they guide conduct and create objects and agents. This ontology in terms of social construction allows constructivists to account for aspects of world politics that realists and neorealists ignore.

As stated earlier, constructivists focus on the constitution of international agents and unlike realists and neo-realists, do not agree that states act in accordance solely with the material structural incentives of the international system.Feminist theory is the extension of feminism into theoretical, fictional, or philosophical discourse.

It aims to understand the nature of gender inequality. It examines women's and men's social roles, experiences, interests, chores, and feminist politics in a variety of fields, such as anthropology and sociology, communication, media.

Feminism and Constructivism: A Comparison Essay Sample. The discipline of international relations (IR) is one that has witnessed a multitude of variations and shifts. are theorists who purport that the rise of constructivism allows for a further understanding of another international theory, feminism.

This is a branch of critical social. Deconstruction: Deconstruction, form of philosophical and literary analysis, derived mainly from work begun in the s by the French philosopher Jacques Derrida, architecture, anthropology, theology, feminism, gay and lesbian . Poststructural feminism also seeks to criticize the kyriarchy, while not being limited by narrow understandings of kyriarchal theory, particularly through an analysis of the pervasiveness of othering, the social exile of those people removed from the narrow concepts of normal.

Feminist Perspectives on Sex and Gender. First published Mon May 12, ; substantive revision Wed Oct 25, Feminists must be able to address cultural and social differences in gender construction if feminism is to be a genuinely inclusive movement and be either a subordinate or a privileged social position.

In some articles. A Very Short Summary of Socialist Feminist Theory and Practice* Socialist feminism arose in the late ’s. It grew out of the same social ferment and the same consciousness-raising groups that produced other forms of feminism.

Socialist feminists attempted to.

Feminist post-structuralist discourse analysis - Wikipedia